Why Science Needs Art

Art is a powerful tool for telling a scientific story. With many scientific fields dealing with the strangest of the animal kingdom—like creatures with a handful of eyes and bodies so different from our own—art can help us experience these hard-to-imagine parts of the natural world and shed light on new scientific discoveries.

A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain

Coming from the world of outdoor and experiential learning and then the arts and the arts therapies, it seems clear that we think with our bodies as well as our brains. Dancers and climbers both do this. As do joiners and sculptors, painters and decorators and artists. Art as research or art a way of exploring and expressing personal experience connects directly to embodied cognition, but the output of exploration or research is art and experience. If we are seeking models for understanding art making experiences and or outdoor experiences, embodied cognition is a kind of conduit to shift ideas from one context to another.

SARA MORAWETZ : PRINCIPIA AT DOMINIK MERSCH GALLERY, SYDNEY

PRINCIPIA DOMINIK MERSCH GALLERY DECEMBER  6th – 22nd, 2019 I am delighted to invite you all to my upcoming exhibition PRINCIPIA opening at Dominik Mersch Gallery this Friday December 6th with a reception from 6pm-8pm. A durational performance will also be staged in the gallery on Saturday, December 7th between 12pm–5pm. It would be wonderful to see …

Even a small amount of creativity can help you cope with modern life, reveals new research by BBC Arts and UCL

Good news for those juggling time-pressures in today’s busy, modern life. According to ground breaking research commissioned by BBC Arts, even the briefest time spent on a creative pastime such as painting, pottery or playing the piano, has an impact on our wellbeing and emotions. In the largest study of its kind, with almost 50,000 …

Walking from Dunkirk to Barcelona to Measure the Curvature of the Earth

For 112 days Sara Morawetz retraced the 2,000 kilometre journey of two 18th century astronomers, tasked with defining the length of a metre. On 24 June 2018 artist Sara Morawetz started walking. In sturdy leather boots and a broad-brimmed, blue felt hat, she headed south from Dunkirk, France’s most northerly town. For 112 days, over 2,000 …