Shakespeare, icons, archetypes, current affairs (and riots)

Two great programmes on BBC Radio 4 today, Mon March 16th. There is stuff about Trump and Twitter Spats, American history, the role of popular movies in political or philosophical discourse or not, and an astonishing tale of the Astor Palace Riot in which Shakespeare and 'The English Actor' was responsible for the deaths of 31 rioting commoners at the hands of the US militia.

Sally Potter and the best time to start is now

The best time to start is now (don’t wait) Take responsibility for everything (it saves time) Don’t blame anyone or anything (including yourself) Give up being a moviemaker victim (of circumstance, weather, lack of money, mean financiers, vicious critics, greedy distributors, indifferent public, etc.)

Folk Music

People play folk music the world over, and tell us about their lives, their strife, their loves, their woes. This song is from the borders, a land with a long history of strife and conflict, bloodshed and blackmail. The Reivers coined the phrase. I like the idea that folk music in Brixton is the same as folk music from Hexham. Here's a toast to our differences and to our commonalities. Like Rhianna says of strife, ' You break bread with me, you like me, it's our problem.'

A Toast To Our Differences

A follow up to Rhianna's call to pull up. "Let's raise a glass And have a toast to all our differences. You carry me on your shoulders. When I don't know what my limit is. I wonder where my limit lies, my limit lies." Rudimental

A Ragged Memoriam – Outdoor Art

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“Because we arrived without sponsorship or political agenda, people always received us with open arms,” JR says. “They are happy to see another approach, in which they are actors.” JR (French, born 1983). 28 Millimètres, Women Are Heroes, Action dans la Favela Morro da Providência, Favela de Jour, Rio de Janeiro, 2008. Installation image. Wheat-pasted posters on buildings. © JR-ART.NET

Yoni Lappin – A Sense of Place – Urban Britain Global Talent

I came across Yoni Lappin through the Mura Masa video, 'Move Me.' Move Me conveys a strong sense of place, urban Britain at it's best. There is a great feeling of performers coming from a whole number of different backgrounds, professionals and amateurs, and that performance is a day to day occurrence for the people involved. This connects a place and performance nicely and introduces people and artists for whom every day is art and theatre, which is why Britain (as with other mixed cultural places) produces such talent and innovation in the arts. Then looking at other video's it's clear that this mix is not just British. The world is a mix of people. The world is full of talent.

A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain

Coming from the world of outdoor and experiential learning and then the arts and the arts therapies, it seems clear that we think with our bodies as well as our brains. Dancers and climbers both do this. As do joiners and sculptors, painters and decorators and artists. Art as research or art a way of exploring and expressing personal experience connects directly to embodied cognition, but the output of exploration or research is art and experience. If we are seeking models for understanding art making experiences and or outdoor experiences, embodied cognition is a kind of conduit to shift ideas from one context to another.